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15 Apr 2018

Athletics NZ Weekly Roundup 16 April 2018

Athletics NZ Weekly Roundup 16 April 2018

Author: Comms Admin  /  Categories: News  / 
Above: Jake Robertson set a New Zealand 10,000m record on his way to fifth place at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Photo by Alisha Lovrich / Temposhot.

AUSTRALIA
XXI Commonwealth Games, Carrara Stadium, Gold Coast Queensland – 8/15 April 2018
8 April
: Alana Barber walked the race of her career to take the silver medal in the 20km race walk on the Currumbin Beachfront.
The 30 year old overcame cramping over the closing stages to finish in 1:34:18, 1:28 behind Jemima Montag of Australia.
With the heat of the day rising throughout the race no one was willing to take the early pace. Barber took up the challenge before the Australian pair of Montag and Claire Tallent decided to spice it up out front.
It was going to plan for Barber who stuck with them up to 7km.
“The first few laps no one wanted to take the lead so I was okay with taking the lead as we were going ridiculously slow which I thought could happen as no one wants to take charge but that was fine I knew I needed to keep control, and who ever went in front of me, to stay with them,” said Barber who holds the New Zealand record of 1:32:19.
“It was quite comfortable going through the middle stages, I was taking on plenty of fluid which I knew I needed to do and keeping as cold as possible because the temperature was getting up.”
Over the final 5km with Montag and Tallent going hammer and tongs out front Barber was happy to hold her form and race in for the bronze medal.
With 2k to go Tallent was disqualified, leaving Barber in the silver medal position.
“Over the last 5k my legs started cramping up quite badly so I’m glad there was no one around me, because I just knew I had to get to the finish line quickly because I didn’t know how much more I could have walked,” said Barber.

Quentin Rew in the earlier men’s 20km finished fifth in 1:21:47. Dane Bird-Smith of Australia won gold in 1:19:34, in a close finish with Tom Bosworth of England 1:19:38 and Kenyan Samuel Ireri Gathimba 1:19:51 all three going under the Games record of 1:19:55 set by Nathan Deakes in Melbourne in 2006. Rew holds the New Zealand record at 1:21:12.
Rew said the pace was on from the start.
“The first half was really fast, I’ve never gone through that fast through 5k or 10k in any 20k race I’ve done. It was really fast from the get go, Dane particularly really pushed it right from the start. I came here to get a medal and so I knew if I was going to put myself in a position to get on the podium I had to be a bit aggressive, but I wasn’t going crazy as I knew I couldn’t stick with those front guys so I let them get away a little bit in the first half and then I found myself in no man’s land. I was ready to attack if one of them fell back but they were just getting faster and faster,” said Rew.
“It was just one of those things. I can’t change what anyone else does so I was ready to pounce if one of them fell off.
“Three of them were under the Commonwealth record so it was a really fast pace.”

Tom Walsh made it look so easy as he convincingly qualified for the final of the shot put, only needing one attempt which he sent out to his second best ever throw and Games record of 22.45m.
Requiring only 19 metres to automatically qualify Walsh, Chukwuebuka Enekwechi of Nigeria with 20.66m and Damien Birkinhead of Australia with 20.47m were the only competitors over 20 metres.
He was just 22cm short of his New Zealand, Oceania and Commonwealth record of 22.67m set in Henderson last month.

9 April:
Para athleteHolly Robinson had the Commonwealth title and a fresh world record in the javelin throw cruelly snatched from her grasp in the final round by Welsh thrower Hollie Arnold.

It was ecstasy for Robinson as she opened the competition with a mighty effort of 43.32m, to eclipse Arnold’s existing world record of 43.02m. The 23 year old from Dunedin was unable to replicate that performance in the remaining five rounds, but had a consistent series with all her throws over 40 metres. Her previous best and New Zealand record was 42.68m.
Not to be denied her record Arnold responded with a throw of 44.43m for the gold medal. Robinson final throw was 41.12m.
Robinson said that she was still happy with the silver medal.
“Just to compete for my country is amazing as I’ve always dreamed for it. Although I settled for second place I did throw further than I’ve ever thrown before and won that silver medal and I’m absolutely stoked with that.
“It was a really big emotional sort of competition breaking the world record and my PB in the first round was just crazy and I just had to calm down from that and refocus on the next round and credit to Hollie for bringing that big one out in the last round, it’s pretty cool,” said Robinson.

Tom Walsh ticked off another goal in his quest to hold every global shot put title, taking the 2018 Commonwealth Games gold medal on the Gold Coast.
It was New Zealand’s first men’s Commonwealth Games gold medal in the shot put, something that Walsh said he was getting used to doing.
“I’m getting used to doing those things, New Zealand hadn’t had a men’s world title until I came along indoors and outdoors, so pretty stoked to add another one to the tally, I’m only missing one now which is the Olympic gold and that’s another two years away,” he said.
The 26 year old from Christchurch opened with a throw of 20.40, to trail Australian Damien Birkinhead who was out to 20.50m in the first round.
Walsh improved and took the lead in round two with 21.21m. The next throw Walsh looked his usual pleased self sending the ball of steel out close to his Games record of 22.45m set the day before in qualifying, only to have a red flag raised after he clipped the front board of the circle with his foot.
Walsh extended his winning throw to 21.41m in round four. Chukwuebuka Enekwechi of Nigeria was second with a personal best 21.14m and Tom Nedow of Canada third also in a season best 20.91m.
Walsh said despite not throwing as well as he had hoped, he was very pleased with the win.
“I’m really happy with winning the gold and knocking that off. I didn’t quite throw as well as I wanted to, I had one or two good throws out there but I couldn’t manage to stay in the circle.
“At the end of the day I came here to win gold and I did that,” said Walsh.
Camille Buscomb was well placed in second over the early stages of the 10,000m final but felt the pressure in the later stages and was unable to foot it with the leading group over the final laps and the 27 year old from Hamilton drifted back. She finished 14th in a respectable 32:23.91, the second fastest time of her career. The 12 time New Zealand champion said that her training indicated that she was capable of a faster time.
“I felt all right, it was a bit quicker than it felt and then they starting picking it up and I couldn’t go that extra bit and I couldn’t go any faster,” said Buscomb.
“I just didn’t have it today which is a real shame,” she added.

10 April: Brad Mathas was over the moon, recording a personal best and making the final of the 800m at his first Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast on Tuesday. The seven times New Zealand champion drew the first of three heats where the first two and the two next fastest advanced to the final. Without semi-finals the passage into the final was much tougher. Mathas started strongly and settled into a good position going through the first 400m in sixth place in 52.8 seconds.
“It felt pretty cruisy and I just wanted to stay in contact with that top four and I knew in that last 150 I was going to come home strong so it was just a matter of staying in contact. In hindsight I maybe should have been a little bit closer and that comes from experience from racing, just got to keep ticking the boxes,” said Mathas.
The 24 year old, based in Melbourne, finished fourth in 1:46.32, clipping 0.12 off his best set in a last minute bid to make the Games team in Canberra in January.
Mathas then had to sit through the next two heats to see if he was one of the next two fastest and he was rewarded with the third runners in both races recording a slower time.
An elated Mathas hugged training partner Joseph Deng of Australia on realising he was in the final. Deng a 19 year old had finished third in Mathas’ heat in 1:45.72 and was the other fastest qualifier.
Aucklander Alex Beddoes representing Cook Islands ran a PB 1:51.64 (7H2).

Joseph Millar excelled in the heats of the 200m, requiring to finish in the first two to qualify for the semi-final, the 25 year old powered through to second in 21.10.
Millar drew lane five, hit the bend hard and chased the winner Anaso Jobodwana of South Africa down the straight, Jobodwana winning in 20.89.
“I knew from my first step that I moving out of the blocks and just knew that my bend is quite a strong part of my race and knowing there would probably be a head wind on the straight I put a bit more effort into that and chilled out as much as I could and came down the home straight and really happy with the way I ran first up and it’s a good warm up for the semi-final,” said Millar who holds the New Zealand record of 20.37.

Cameron French faced the same scenario as Mathas in the heats of the 400m hurdles. But unfortunately it wasn’t to be, the three times New Zealand champion finished sixth in 50.60, outside his personal best of 49.33.
The 25 year old from Hamilton said the spark was missing.
“I warmed up pretty good, I thought I felt alright, I didn’t have enough spark today, I worked as hard as I could,” said French.

Julia Ratcliffe turned silver into gold winning the hammer throw Commonwealth title on the Gold Coast four years after taking the silver medal in Glasgow.
The four times New Zealand champion and record holder with 70.75m led throughout the competition after her opening throw of 66.19m.
Ratcliffe consolidated her lead in the next round with 68.60m. Australian Alexandra Hulley threatened in round two with a throw of 68.20m. The top seeds, Jillian Weir of Canada and Sophie Hitchon both struck trouble on release sending the hammer into the cage. They both fouled their three attempts and were out of the competition.
The 24 year old from Hamilton cemented her claim for the gold with a fifth round throw of 69.94m. Hulley did not improve and had to settle for the silver with her compatriot Lara Nielsen taking the bronze with 65.03m.
“It’s just out of this world,” was her reaction coming off the field.
“The warm ups I was really freaking out, because I don’t know what I was doing, I’ve been doing a heel turn all season because that was something new, but for some reason in the warm ups I decided to try toe turns and I didn’t realise till two throws in, so I fixed that,” said Ratcliffe.
“I had a good first one just to get it out of the cage and I then got my grove back and got into it a bit more.
“It was pretty shocking to see Jillian Weir and Sophie Hitchon foul out, both awesome throwers so that was a big shock, after Sophie threw it in the cage for the third time I was sitting there thinking oh my goodness I could win a gold medal, very high chance of the gold medal. I knew Alex Hulley was in good form because she threw out close to a PB and I was just hoping that I could push it out and she wouldn’t catch me so I managed to get a good one out in the fifth round which was actually two centimetres less than I threw in Glasgow for the silver, but it’s on the day and we got a bit of torrential rain in the middle so managed to miss that thankfully in my throws.”
It has been an uphill battle for Ratcliffe over the last three months overcoming a shoulder injury.

11 April: Joseph Millar described it as a funny night as he bowed out of the Commonwealth Games failing to advance to the final of the 200m.
The 25 year old five times New Zealand champion started well but coming off the bend was unable to hold his posture and lost a lot of speed at a crucial part of the race.
Requiring to finish in the first two or a time faster than 20.62 Millar was sixth in 21.01 a slight improvement on his heat time.
The London world championships representative said that he bucked coming through the bend.
“I got out of the blocks really well, worked the bend quite well caught the guy on the outside of me about half way through.
“And transitioning into the straight I did something a little funny and lost a lot of speed and I buckled through the core and once you lose posture it’s very hard regain that speed that you’ve just lost.
“I did come back a little bit in the home straight, but by that point the damage had been done and that’s the nature of sprinting,” said Millar.
“Happy as to make the semi-final, but was expecting a little bit faster after putting in some effort this time,” he added.
A much needed break is on the agenda now.

12 April: As Tom Walsh did, it only took one attempt for Dame Valerie Adams to qualify for the final of the shot put.
The three times consecutive Commonwealth champion, twice Olympic champion and four times world champion needed 16.50m to automatically qualify and she easily send the shot out to 18.52m.
Dame Valerie was the best to qualify, Brittany Crew of Canada the next best with 17.50m.

Angie Petty drew the fastest heat and finished fifth in 2:00.62, unfortunately not able to advance to the final from this position despite her time.
The first two from each of the three heats and the next two fastest advanced.
Petty led over the first lap in 59.62 but when the pace went into the back straight she was unable to respond, Caster Semenya winning in 1:59.26.
The eleven times New Zealand champion was disappointed with her effort.
“I think I did all the right things in the first 500m I just couldn’t respond when they went with 250m to go which I was annoyed with myself over.
“I just didn’t feel great in the back straight and as I come around the bend I said to myself no I’ve still got more, I’ve still got more just be patient. I didn’t want to go too wide around the bend and I should have gone a bit earlier, but my legs were really tying up in that last 50 metres,” she said.
It frustrates Petty being so close.
“It seems like in the last few championships being that close, which is really hard especially to have run two flat point six and just miss out.
“It was a hard field and when you’ve got Caster Semenya and it’s the first two to automatically qualify you still aim to win it but she’s another whole league so really it’s kind of fighting for that next spot without being negative it makes it tough to qualify without having a semi-final.”

Brad Mathas finished strongly in the final of the 800m improving down the final straight to finish fifth in a personal best 1:46.07.
This betters his previous best recorded in the heats.
Mathas was at the back of the field over the first lap covered in 52.4, improved his place down the back straight and challenged hard down the stretch picking up a couple more placings.
Wycliffe Kinyamal of Kenya won in 1:45.11, from Kyle Langford of England 1:45.16 and Luke Mathews of Australia 1:56.60.
Mathas was on the whole satisfied with his Commonwealth Games debut.
“Obviously my goal coming into this race is to medal, I set high standards for myself. On paper I was ranked eighth, but I still whole heartedly believe in myself that I could get a medal, but I just fell short,” said Mathas.
“The first 200m was hot I knew they would get out pretty hard but I didn’t think it would be that hard, and I found myself last and I made sure I didn’t panic because I knew that last 100m that people were going to die.
“I managed to pick up a few people but two people not enough,” he said.
The seven times New Zealand champion said there was no shame in believing that he could medal.
“I’ve now just got to keep improving and I believe that I can do it,” he added.

Siositina Hakeai repeated her fourth placing four years ago in Glasgow after having the bronze medal snatched from her grasp in the final round in the discus throw.
The 24 year old from Auckland was out to 56.00m in the first round placing her third in the competition. Hakeai improved to 57.16m in round four and held third with this distance till the sixth round.
Navjeet Dhillon of India let fly with a 57.43m throw to grab third leaving Hakeai heart broken and in fourth.
Dani Stevens of Australia won with a Games record of 68.26m, breaking Kiwi Beatrice Faumuina’s record of 65.92m set in Kuala Lumpur in 1998.
Hakeai, four times New Zealand champion, who has a personal best of 60.54m said that these things happen.
“It wasn’t disappointing just heart breaking, She put up a good fight and things like this happen and there is nothing you can do, just go back home and try and bounce back stronger and better.
“If you had asked me ten to twelve weeks ago if I will be at the Comm Games I would have said you’re joking, you’re kidding yourself.”
She then acquired a new coach in Kirsten Hellier.
“The last ten weeks I’ve been with Kirsten and it has been really great and I’m here.
“I had to change a lot of things in a short period of time with the new coach, it wasn’t ideal, but hey we’re here. This has been my most consistent season, I got a PB and what more can you ask for. Unfortunately I didn’t do it tonight.”

Nick Southgate failed to achieve a height in the pole vault.
The 23 year old six times New Zealand champion bypassed the opening two heights in the competition of 4.80m and 5.00m opting to come in at 5.20m.
He missed at his three attempts a disappointment for him at his first major international competition. Southgate, who has a personal best of 5.47m, was over the bar on his last attempt but brought the bar down on his descent.
He has previously finished fourth at the World Youth Championships and ninth at the World University Games.
Southgate said the height wasn’t a problem it was the lack of consistency in his run-up.
“I opened at 5.20m, what I thought would be a pretty comfortable height and looking back maybe I should have started at 5m. It wasn’t the height that was a problem it was my inconsistency in the run up and just couldn’t get something going, if I’d had a jump in I knew get on a roll. It was just about getting that first one and unfortunately I didn’t do that.”

13 April: Eliza McCartney was unable to fulfil the expectation of a gold medal in the pole vault that New Zealand was looking for.
In a great battle with Alysha Newman, McCartney had to finally accept the silver medal after Newman cleared 4.75m in her first attempt. The Rio Olympic bronze medallist missed her first attempt at 4.75m and bypassed her other two opportunities at this height and went straight to 4.80m which she missed with her two remaining attempts. Newman was unable to clear 4.80m at her first attempt and after McCartney had missed retired with the gold medal and a Games record of 4.75m. Nina Kennedy of Australia was third with 4.60m.
McCartney who has a best of 4.82m said it was a good competition.
“I knew I would have to fight really hard to get in the medals and do well. I got out there and I gave it my all and it got me second and I can’t even be disappointed with the medal and I’m happy.
“I think the disappointment comes from those last attempts at 4.80m, I certainly hit the height and I definitely know I can clear those heights so it was a little disappointing I couldn’t pull it out today,” she said.
“I was on the biggest poles I’ve ever used and I wasn’t quite getting around them enough which is quite difficult with the big poles,” she added.
McCartney said she knew Newman was capable of winning.
“Alysha was really jumping well today and I also know that she a competitor, she just fired it when she competes and so it was not unexpected and I’m glad she was jumping the best she could as that is amazing for her and regardless of what she jumped I was still focussing on the bigger heights that I wanted to get. If I’d jumped 4.80, 85, 90 I wouldn’t have cared if I’d come second at all. If there’s any disappointment it comes from how I was jumping not from the placing.”

New Zealand’s other competitor in the pole vault 18 year old Olivia McTaggart finished ninth with a height of 4.30m.
The former national junior and youth champion had come back from injury, injuring her ankle during the warm up at the New Zealand championships in Hamilton last month.
“I was really close to my PB, it was really hard not to get that, but considering my build up I’m really happy, I can’t complain.
“The atmosphere was crazy, and I’m so proud of Eliza getting that second, it was so awesome to see. It ended up to be a really tough competition and it was good to be part of it.
“My opening height 3.85m was nice and easy, four metres was a little bit scary and I had to get it second attempt and then 4.15m and on from there I felt a lot more confident, and the 4.30m where the bar just stayed there.
“It was really hard at the 4.40m as I’ve been going for that PB for so long, it is my PB. So considering my injuries and everything that I’ve been through I’m just so proud to be here,” said McTaggart.

Dame Valerie Adams was not disappointed in missing out on her fourth Commonwealth gold medal in the shot put.
After leading the competition with her first round throw of 18.70m right up to the last round, Jamaica’s Danniel Thomas-Dodd produced the winning performance of 19.36m.
Dame Valerie was unable to snatch it back and her final attempt was 18.55m and settled for the silver medal.
“I’m happy with that,” was Adams reaction coming off the field.
“It’s been an amazing six months of my life, it’s been incredible, today I left my heart out there it was a great fight, Danniel deserved to win today she threw a massive throw, she’s young (25), she’s strong.
“She’s in shape, she’s just come back from world indoors with a silver medal from there,” said Adams.
“It was a great competition and I’m honoured to wear the fern once again.”
Dame Valerie didn’t realise what the challenges would be coming back from childbirth with a daughter Kimoana six months ago.
“But all I knew was that I wanted to give this a good crack, only six weeks ago I shot in practice only 16 metres and our progress has been pretty incredible and I must give a massive ups to my coach Scott Goodman who has just been nothing but phenomenal, and also to my mother in law who has been able to look after my child while I train and live my dream for a fifth Commonwealth Games consecutively. My first Commonwealth Games I was sixteen, today I’m an old 33 year old,” said Adams.
“I’m so proud to be a Kiwi, I’m so proud and honoured that there are so many Kiwi’s out here tonight, and it feels like we competed in New Zealand.”
Canadian Brittany Crew who competed against Adams in New Zealand before the Games was third with 18.32m.

Jake Robertson in his first track race in 12 months, finished an excellent fifth in a high quality 10,000m field in a New Zealand national record of 27:30.90.
This took nearly three seconds off his twin brother Zane’s record set in finishing 12th at the Rio Olympics, 15 seconds .
Robertson who had flown in from the States two days ago said although he was wanting a fast time, the New Zealand record was not on his mind.
“I wasn’t actually thinking about the New Zealand record, I was told after I finished, I thought I’d missed it,” he said.
Robertson settled into tenth pace early on and improved steadily as the laps rolled by.
The pace dropped with six laps to go and Robertson went into the lead.
“I said nah I’m not having this, I was having time in my thoughts as I wanted to hold on to a decent time and I did that.”
But with two laps remaining Joshua Cheptegei of Uganda and Canada’s Mohammed Ahmed took off and went neck and neck to the finish. Cheptegei winning in a Games record of 27:19.62 from Ahmed who recorded 27:20.56.
“Credit to them they smashed me in the last two laps I just couldn’t handle that pace I did pick up but I was just trying to run whoever down that I could and I just couldn’t get them,” said Robertson.
The 28 year old who had a best track time of 27:45.46 and a 10km road time equalling his brothers New Zealand record of 27:28 in winning at New Orleans recently said he prefers the road.
“It’s actually been a year since I raced on the track so it’s completely different event and surface to what I’m used to. I’d love to race the guys who beat me tonight on the roads because it would be a different story,” he said.

14 April: Camille Buscomb finished 12th in the 5000m in 15:55.45.
In a slow run race the 27 year old settled into the middle of the field and when the pace dropped moved up to third.
Over the later stages the twice national champion at the distance was tenth and over the final two laps held her twelfth placing.
Buscomb said it was hard.
“I gave it my best, it was really hot. I wasn’t ranked high at all and I learnt a lot,” she said.
“It was really tough competition,” she added.
Hellen Obiri of Kenya won in 15:13.11 from compatriot Margaret Kipkemboi 15:15.28 and Laura Weightman of England.

Meanwhile Ben Langton Burnell missed out on making the top eight in the javelin competition.
After three rounds he finished in tenth with his best throw of 73.77m.
The twice New Zealand champion and London world championships representative qualified in ninth for the final with 75.29m.
His personal best is 82.44m.
India’s Neeraj Chopra won with a throw of 86.47m, Hamish Peacock of Australia was second with 82.59m and Anderson Peters of Granada third with 82.20m.

AUCKLAND
Autumn Throws Meeting
, AUT Millennium Stadium North Shore – 3 April 2018
Anthony Nobilo 7.26kg HT 55.73m, 6kg HT 64.18m, Rizvan Caukwell 42.66m PB and 43.83m. Zane Chong 800g JT 51.75m. Connor Bell 2kg DT 48.04m, 1.5kg DT 63.27m. Isaac Vaeau Mulitalo 5kg HT 47.11m, Logan Pringle 43.40m PB. Jayden Williamson 1.25kg DT 45.84m, 4kg HT 52.93m, Caleb Koko 44.01m PB. Ella Pilkington HT 50.09m, Mellata Tatola 44.38m. Savannah Scheen 3kg HT 44.51m. Anne Goulter 7.26kg weight throw 13.12m, better than the New Zealand masters W55 record of 12.24m.

Southland Centennial Relays, Sacred Heart College, Glendowie – 14 April 2018
North Harbour Bays won three of the four relays on the programme. Cameron Graves, Sam Cadwallader, Jeremy Holyer, Steven Langdon and Louis Young won the senior men 5 x 3000m in 50:21. Lydia Henderson, Amy Shaw and Amanda Holyer the senior women 3 x 3000m in 37:12. Cara Billen, Carolyn Smith and Michelle Hopkins the master women in 38:04. Owairaka’s team of Nick Moore, Daniel Coates, Simon Mace and Paul White won the master men 4 x 3000m in 42:30.

WANGANUI
North Island Secondary Schools Championships, Cooks Gardens – 7/8 April 2018
Senior Boys: Connor Bell DT 60.53m (record). Cody Wilson 100m 11.30 (-2.8), 200m 22.24 (-1.6). Michael Graham 400m 49.61 PB. Max Spencer 800m 1:55.99, 1500m 4:00.38 PB. Dylan Lynch 3000m 8:56.57 PB. Finn Seeds 2000m steeplechase 6:15.66 PB. Ryan Jones 3000m race walk 16:07.57. Jonathan Maples 300m H 40.50 PB. Roderick Solo 110m hurdles 15.26 (-2.5), LJ 6.92m (+4.0), TJ 13.65m (+1.3) PB. Sean Howe SP 15.09m. Cam Robinson JT 64.15m.
Senior Girls: Leah Belfield 100m 12.82 (-4.3), 200m 25.47 (-0.9). Alessandra Macdonald 300m H 46.21. Josephine Reeves HJ 1.71m. Lisa Putt LJ 5.56m (+1.3) PB. Kayla Goodwin TJ 11.53m (-0.5). Savannah Scheen DT 37.99m, JT 39.51m. Alana Ryan HT 51.42m. Hannah Gilberd 2000m RW 10:54.02. Charli Miller 2000m steeplechase 7:13.57.
Intermediate Boys: Charles Annals 100m H 13.60 (+1.8), 300m H 41.31 PB, LJ 6.53m (+0.2) PB, TJ 13.09m (+0.4). Jayden Williamson HJ 1.89m. Jacob Stockwell 100m 11.22 (-2.4), 200m 22.29 (0.0). Trent Campbell 400m 51.39. Andre Le Pine-Day 800m 1:59.40, 1500m 4:05.60. Will Anthony 3000m 9:03.89. Zion Trigger Feitele SP 16.81m PB. Nik Kini DT 59.18m.
Intermediate Girls: Genna Maples 100m 12.78 (-4.1), 200m 25.11 (-1.7), LJ 5.64m (+1.9). Tayla Brunger 400m 56.15 PB. Krystie Solomon 800m 2:15.43. Rebecca Baker 1500m 4:33.73 PB, 3000m 10:12.56. Hinewai Knowles 80m H 11.87 (+1.0). Maria Sartin 300m H 47.66 PB. Aria Rhodes PV 3.62m. Faith Araba TJ 11.04m (+2.4). Emma Bull HT 41.96m PB.
Junior Boys: Oliver Krynen 100m 12.30 (-1.6), 200m 24.41 (-2.8). Avansh Kumar 300m 38.52. Mathijs Wetzels 3000m 9:37.53. Amilame Finau 80m H 11.82m (+1.1). Sitiveni Lose HJ 1.74m. Ollie Morton-Farrelly SP 13.01m, DT 47.92m.
Junior Girls: Nadia Evans 100m 13.12 (-3.9), 200m 25.94 (-1.6). Amy Alderton LJ 5.03m (+3.1), TJ 10.84m (+1.1), heats 100m 12.95 (0.0). Natalia Rankin-Chitar DT 40.51m (record) PB. Jasmine Salamoa HT 38.68m (record).

At the Grade 12 & 13 Interprovincials held at TET Stadium Inglewood over Easter Winnie Palamo of Canterbury was the G13 winner.

CHRISTCHURCH
Hagley Memorial Relays – 14 April 2018
Senior Men: University 51:52, Christchurch Avon 53:59, Papanui Toc H 54:25. Fastest 4km lap Oska Baynes 12:10.
Master Men: New Brighton Olympic 55:33. Fastest lap Mark Bailey 12:57.
Senior Women: University 59:50, University 67:07, Papanui Toc H 70:42. Fastest lap Jean Kozyniak 14:38.
Master Women: North Canterbury 69:42. Fastest lap Tina Cox 16:14.

USA
PAC 10 vs Big 10
, Temple, 23 March: Jordan Rackham De Spong 1500m 3:51.54 (10).
FSU Relays, Tallahassee, 23 March: Caitlin McQuilkin-Bell 800m 2:12.08 (4).
Bulldog Relays, Mississippi, 23 March: Katherine Badham 3000m steeplechase 10:58.21 (2).
AR Spring Invitational, Fayetteville, 23/24 March: Tannock Blair 800m 1:54.03 (3R4). Hannah Miller 3000m 9:35.67 (1RA). Anneke Grogan 3000m steeplechase 11:08.49 (2). Atipa Mabonga LJ 5.65m (+2.1) (9).
Williamette Invitational, Williamette, 24 March: Chris Brake 100m 11.21 (+1.8) (2R2).
Road Runner Invitational, San Antonio, 24 March: Aaron Booth PV 4.55m (11), DT 39.80m (20).Alison Andrews-Paul 1500m 4:27.10 PB (2R2).
Victor Lopez Classic, Houston, 24 March: Imogen Hull 1500m 4:47.78 (9R2).
Spring Break Invitational, Jacksonville, 24 March: Charlotte Blair 1500m 4:50.93 (2R4).
UM Invitational, Mobile, 30 March: Luke Fielding 1500m 4:06.08 (1).
Texas Relays, Austin, 30 March: Mike Lowe 5000m 14:25.49 PB (6).
Raleigh Relays, Raleigh, 30/31 March: Tannock Blair 1500m 3:50.44 (7R8), Angus White 3:53.07 PB (8R6), Marcus Karamanolis 3:54.06 (9R6). Arianna Lord 1500m 4:45.55 (11R4).
Stanford Invitational, Palo Alto, 30/31 March: George Beamish 5000m 13:55.65(13). Jeff Lautenslager 5000m 14:32.30 (16R3). Olivia Burdon 5000m 15:42.65 PB (1R1). Emily Roughan 5000m 16:28.18 PB (5R3). Hannah Miller 10,000m 33:43.35 PB (1RB). Grace McConnochie 10,000m 34:14.18 (22R1).
San Francisco Distance Carnival, San Francisco, 31 March: Joshua Browne 800m 1:56.70 (6R2). Ben Collerton 110m H 15.32 (+0.5) PB (7R3), LJ 7.06m PB (NWI) (7), DT 42.11m PB (19). Anneke Grogan 3000m steeplechase 11:02.53 PB (15R1).
Tom Benich Invitational, Greeley, 31 March: Daniel Hintz 1500m 3:54.33 (1). Harry Ewing 3000m steeplechase 9:20.41 (1). Kerry White 800m 2:15.44 (5).
Florida Relays, Gainsville, 31 March: Katherine Badham 1500m 4:41.06 PB (3R4).
Bobcat Invitational, San Marcos, 31 March: Atipa Mabonga TJ 11.98m (0.0) (8).
Jim Click Shootout, Tucson Arazona, 5/6 April: Aaron Booth decathlon 7397 points (1) (100m 11.09, LJ 7.03m, SP 13.19m, HJ 1.92m, 400m 49.93, 110m H 15.90, DT 39.27m, PV 4.55m, JT 56.71m, 1500m 4:44.80).
SLU Billiken Invitational, St Louis, 7 April: Tannock Blair 800m 1:52.85 (1).
CU Invitational, Boulder, 7 April: Daniel Hintz 1500m 3:51.37 (6). Harry Ewing 3000m steeplechase 9:12.74 PB (2). Kerry White 800m 2:13.49 (3).
South Alabama Invitational, Mobile, 7 April: Luke Fielding 1500m 4:01.50 (3), 3000m 8:59.52 (5).
Arcadia Invitational, Los Angeles, 7 April: Sam Colyer LJ 6.20m (+0.3) (16), TJ 13.67m (0.0) PB (12).
Colonial Relays, Williamsburg, 7 April: Holly Manning 400m 57.97 (2R6). Jessica Martin 3000m 10:12.10 (10).
Oregon Invitational, Eugene, 7 April: Olivia Burdon 800m 2:12.41 (7), 1500m 4:24.60 (3). Greer Alsop LJ 5.33m (NWR) (4), TJ 12.27m (NWR) (2).
Carl Knight Invitational, Nacogdoches, 7 April: Charlotte Blair 800m 2:24.14 (6), 1500m 4:49.63 (6).
McNeese Springtime Classic, Lake Charles, 7 April: Imogen Hull 5000m 18:14.24 (2).

FRANCE
ISF World Secondary Schools Cross Country Championships, Paris 2/7 April 2018
Boys 4500m
: Sam Tanner 16:10 (2), Liam Back 16:50 (16), George Cory-Wright 17:13 (34), Andre Hernandez 17:18 (37), Logan Slee 17:25 (42), Dion Houston 18:10 (54).
Girls 3000m: Hannah O’Connor 13:41 (4), Aimee Fergusson 13:41 (5), Phoebe McKnight 13:59 (11), Sofia Kennedy 14:19 (29), Tessa Webb 14:31 (34), Tessa Hunt 14:46 (40).
Teams Boys 4000m: Westlake Boys High School (2) (Murdoch McIntyre 16:41 (5), David Moore 16:57 (10), Stuart Hofmeyr 17:01 (13), Danie Robertson 17:11 (21), Zachery Keenan 17:24 (28), Blair Hill 18:03 (47).
Teams Girls 3000m: St Cuthbert’s (3) (Isabella Richardson 15:10 (23), Chloe Browne 15:26 (24), Bella Browne 15:31 (25), Emily Hacket-Pain 15:42 (33), Claire Rees 15:48 (38), Emma Hamilton 16:25 (64).

ROAD AND TRAIL RACES AROUND THE COUNTRY
Whangarei
Whangarei parkrun 5km, 7 April: Steve Vaughan 20:00, Steve Fairley 20:27, Steve Cowan 20:52. 14 April: Steve Cowan 20:49.

Auckland
O’Hagan’s 5km, Viaduct Harbour, 3 April: Adam Berry 17:15, Richard McLellan 17:55, Logan Horsford 18:06. Monique Smith 19:52, Christine Adamson 19:58, Andy Kane 20:32. 10 April: Steven Langdon 15:55, James Spence 16:35, Adam Berry 17:07. Monique Smith 19:41, Christine Adamson 20:04, Andy Kane 20:32.
Owairaka 5km in the Park, 28 March: Matt Bailey 18:03, James Keating 19:30, Scott Marchant-Ludlow 20:11.
Rat Race 5km, Takapuna, 11 April: Andrew Cave 18:32, Paul Clarke 20:54. Rose Dillon 20:12.
Barry Curtis parkrun 5km, 7 April: Jack Ryan 18:41, Grant Lincoln 18:52, Brent McLeod 19:35. 14 April: Steve Darby 18:25, Grant Lincoln 18:59, Oscar Mahy 19:09.
Cornwall Park parkrun 5km, 7 April: Matt Bailey 18:22, Milad Rafiei 18:34, Alexander Mildenhall 18:51. 14 April: Mark Bailey 18:22, Milad Rafiei 18:34, Alexander Mildenhall 18:51.
Millwater parkrun 5km, 7 April: Daniel Chen 17:52, Dean Horrell 19:23, Jeremy Smart 19:31. Nicola Keegan 20:33. 14 April: Liam Gibson 20:08, Matthew Peach 20:18, Chris Brown 20:43.
Western Springs parkrun, 7 April: Sam Walker 17:51, Jonty Oram 17:53, Peter Kenny 18:23. Nicola Handley 19:49.
Shore to Shore 5.9km, Takapuna to Milford, 8 April: Cameron Maunder 21:20, Simon Maunder 21:21, Taiga Kato 22:38. Suya Haering 23:31, Tamsin Dales 24:05, Emma Davies 26:01.
Auckland Waterfront Half Marathon, incorporating Auckland Half Marathon Championship, Mission Bay, 8 April: Jono Jackson 1:10:34, Mark Boyce 1:13:01, Nick Pannett 1:15:26. Lisa Cross 1:19:39, Marisa Ruhter 1:25:31, Katherine Morgan 1:25:44. 10km; Mick Keating 32:40, Steven Langdon 33:08, Wayne Guest 33:52. Annika Pfitzinger 36:46, Sabina Piras 38:32, Christine Adamson 43:18.

Hamilton
Lake parkrun 5km, 7 April: Steve Darby 17:52, Gareth Dodd 18:40, Matthew Hillary 19:06. Mikayla Nielsen 19:41, Tanja Miller 20:05, Veronika Adams 20:25. 14 April: Simon Kerr 17:53, Joe Morgan 18:03, Adam Morgan 19:03. Melissa Gillespie 20:18, Veronika Adams 20:22, Kirsten Milne 20:33.

Cambridge
Cambridge parkrun 5km, 14 April: Matthew Vaughan 19:48, Nigel Cross 20:13, Scott Wrenn 20:53.

Tauranga
Tauranga Half Marathon, 15 April: Regan Bones 1:15:43, Richard Malcolm 1:18:23, Dirk Peters 1:19:12. Alice Mason 1:16:37 (second overall), Nancy Jiang 1:22:06, Baiba Muzikante 1:31:26.

Rotorua
Puarenga parkrun 5km, 7 April: Brendon Keenan 18:16, Leigh Reynolds 19:18, Sam Rossiter 19:28. 14 April: Andrew Crosland 18:16, Marc Hughes 19:45.

Taupo
Taupo parkrun 5km, 7 April: Liam Davies 19:58, Quentin Livingstone 20:41. 14 April: Quentin Livingstone 20:22, Tobias Haseler 20:45.

Palmerston North
Victoria Esplanade parkrun 5km, 7 April: Sam Benthan 16:15, Rich Marshall 19:45, Stephen Berg 19:59. 14 April: Edward Currie 17:31, Jon Clearwater 17:37, Rod Masters 19:56.

Wellington
Kapiti Coast parkrun 5km, 7 April: Steffan Wong 19:34, Marcelo Amaya 20:09, Simon Denman 20:31. Renae Creser 20:53. 14 April: Marcelo Amaya 19:27, Daniel Bremner 20:52.
Lower Hutt parkrun 5km, 7 April: Geoff Ferry 17:52, Darren Gordon 18:18, Gus Reece 18:31. 14 April: Brian Garmonsway 16:03, Peter Roberts 17:43, Mark Bouwman 18:27. Jayme Maxwell 18:36.
Porirua parkrun 5km, 7 April: Mark Bouwman 18:39, Tony Buckingham 19:22, Wullie Gunn 19:34. Michelle Van Looy 20:24. 14 April: Lachlan Hawkes 20:25. Michelle Van Looy 20:40.
The Honest 10km, Evans Bay, 15 April: David Creamer 38:36, Robin Leverington 39:45, James Waite 39:47. 5km; Damien Grover 18:25.

Blenheim
Blenheim parkrun 5km, 7 April: Brent Forgesson 18:58, David Lawson 19:03, Tobias Haseler 19:49.

Christchurch
Hagley parkrun 5km, 7 April: Fionn Cullinane 17:09, Nick Kerrigan 18:19, Paul Johnston 18:41. Sarah Langer 20:14. 14 April: Hayden McLaren 15:40, Orestas Rimkus 17:19, Nick Kerrigan 18:02. Sarah Langer 19:52.
Pegasus parkrun 5km, 7 April: Dan Bennetts 17:18, Philip Opie 17:56, John Matthews 18:31. 14 April: Angela Whyte 19:05, Francis Stanbury 19:06, Jared Chapman 19:24, John Durand 19:46.
Tai Tapu Run Festival, 15km, 8 April: Oska Baynes 46:37, Mark Bailey 48:33, Blair McWhirter 49:23. Hannah Oldroyd 56:17, Melanie Angland 58:19, Angela Whyte 59:09.

Wanaka
Wanaka parkrun 5km, 7 April: David O’Sullivan 19:16, Ben Wisbey 20:26. 14 April: Pete Smallfield 17:56, Joe Ross 19:08, Adam Eason 19:15.

Dunedin
Botanic Garden parkrun 5km, 7 April: Chris Mills 18:44, Neale McLanachan 19:19, Grant Guise 19:24. 14 April: Chris Mills 18:54, Grayson Westgate 20:12.

Invercargill
Queens Park parkrun 5km, 7 April: Nathan Shanks 17:48, Brennan Rhodes 18:23, David Sharp 19:28. 14 April: Brenan Rhodes 18:36, Kenneth Murray 19:44, David Hayes 20:42.



Murray McKinnon
Athletics New Zealand Correspondent
0274 806086
murray@mckinnon.co.nz

 
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